Saturday, May 7 – Sunday, November 6, 2016

Early Newcomb Pottery

From the Barbara and Henry Fuldner Collection

This exhibition of 25+ pieces of fine early Newcomb Pottery is a loan to The Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms from the private collection of a direct descendant of Gustav Stickley. Most of the works included have never been publicly exhibited before now. The rich interior of Gustav Stickley’s own home will be the setting to showcase these important objects, allowing connections to be drawn between these two important contemporaneous Arts and Crafts enterprises.  


Early Newcomb Pottery from the Barbara and Henry Fuldner Collection will complement the nearby Princeton University Art Museum exhibition, Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise (May 7 to July 10, 2016) organized by The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service and the Newcomb Art Gallery at Tulane University.

 

Full-size color images available here.

PDF press release available here.

 

Special Exhibition of Early Newcomb Pottery in Gustav Stickley’s former home!

WATER PITCHER with large yellow lily on long green stems, 1905. Harriot Joor, decorator; Joseph Meyer, potter. 8 x 6 in.

 

 

This spring, The Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms in Parsippany, New Jersey will present Early Newcomb Pottery from the Barbara and Henry Fuldner Collection from Saturday, May 7 to Sunday, November 6, 2016. This exhibition features a private collection of 28 examples of early Newcomb Pottery assembled over the past three decades by Barbara Fuldner, a great-granddaughter of Gustav Stickley and a Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms Trustee, and her late husband, Henry Fuldner.

 

 

 

 

Newcomb Exhibition2

 

 

The dining room of the Log House, Gustav Stickley’s own home, that he not only designed, but built and lived in from 1910 to 1917, will be the setting for the exhibition, affording a rare opportunity to see Newcomb Pottery in an authentic period Arts and Crafts setting. Stickley’s Craftsman furniture and the home’s interior will serve as the backdrop for the pottery, and examples of textile work from both enterprises will provide a rich, visual context.

 

 

 

 

VASE with tall green thistles, 1903. Unknown decorator; Joseph Meyer, potter. 8 1/2 x 4 1/4 in.

Founded in 1895 as part the H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College, the women’s coordinate of Tulane University in New Orleans, Newcomb Pottery produced some of the most distinctive and recognizable works of art of the period. During the 45 years it was in operation, approximately one hundred women were affiliated with the enterprise; the majority of the craftswomen were decorators of pottery, but others worked in needlework, metalsmithing, and bookbinding. While Newcomb Pottery embodies its southern origin—decorators were encouraged to draw inspiration from their immediate surroundings—the designs demonstrate a thorough understanding of contemporary design reform principles such as conventionalized, repetitive motifs based on nature.

 

 

 

COVERED INKWELL with small forget-me-nots, 1910. Gerald Mauberret, decorator; Joseph Meyer, potter. 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 inThis focused exhibition will highlight the work of a dozen decorators, focusing on the early period of production at Newcomb Pottery. An accompanying catalog will explore connections between these two contemporaneous Arts and Crafts enterprises, drawing visual and ideological parallels in their approach to design. Newcomb Pottery and Stickley’s multi-faceted endeavors shared many of the same design principles espoused by leading educators and artists of the period. Period publications, including Stickley’s magazine, The Craftsman, were critical to the dissemination of information and served as manuals of good design. These texts will be explored, along with the close networks of educators, artists, editors, and students advocating for design reform, illuminating how these ideals were put into practice.

 

 

 

LARGE JARDINIERE with geraniums, 1903. Mary Williams Butler, decorator; Joseph Meyer, potter. 6 1/2 x 8 1/2 in.The exhibition may be viewed by visitors during all regular tours of the Log House (The Stickley Museum is open for tours Thursday to Sunday. Tours run hourly from 12:15 to 3:15). The museum will also provide opportunities for in-depth exploration through special exhibition tours and educational programs. Please check this page for updates.

 

 

 

Early Newcomb Pottery from the Barbara and Henry Fuldner Collection will complement the nearby Princeton University Art Museum exhibition, Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise (May 7 to July 10, 2016) organized by The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service and the Newcomb Art Gallery at Tulane University.

28 April 2017

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The Stickley Museum
at Craftsman Farms
2352 Route 10 West
Morris Plains, NJ 07950
973.540.0311
info@stickleymuseum.org